The innovators dilemma in biopharma part 3. What would disruption look like?

All opinions are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of Novo Nordisk.

h/t to @Frank_S_David, @scientre, and the LinkedIn Group Big Ideas in Pharma Innovation and R&D Productivity for links and ideas

Part 1 is here.

Part 2 is here.

In the previous parts to this series I’ve covered both why the biopharma industry is ripe for disruption, and what the markets might be that could support a nascent, potentially disruptive technology until it matures enough to allow it to supplant the current dominant industry players.  In this final part I’d like to ask what disruption would look like and provide some examples of directions and companies that exemplify what are, to my mind, these sorts of disruptive technologies and approaches. With, I might add, the complete and utter knowledge that I’m wrong about who and what specifically will be disruptive! But in any case, before we can identify disruption, it’s worthwhile to ask what are the key elements of biopharma drug development that serve as real bottlenecks to affecting  human health, since these are the elements most likely to provide an avenue for disruption. Continue reading

Getting patients back to normal

All opinions my own and do not necessarily reflect those of Novo Nordisk.

Inspired in part by this column from David Shaywitz

Here is a story I had the privilege to hear from Fred Modell, one of the founders of the Jeffrey Modell Foundation (check them out; they’re a great group):  Fred was at their annual picnic, where they host kids with immune system defects.  Fred walked by two early teenage girls, and as he passed by he heard one of them asking the other, “You really kissed a boy?”  Which seems like a common enough thing for two teenage girls to be talking about.

Only in this case it wasn’t.  If your immune system doesn’t function like most everyone else’s, then kissing a boy is not just part of growing up.  It can be dangerous to your health. It’s something  about which you have to think hard, and try your best to understand the implications, and you need to be careful, cautious and measured.  Everything your first kiss really shouldn’t be.

For these girls, though, because of groups like the Modell Foundation and the treatments they’ve helped pioneer and support, these girls could experience the spontaneity of an event that so many kids take for granted.  And they could feel normal, like their friends in school. Continue reading